Tom and Patrick talk with Emily Meeks and Taneesha Thomas of Focused Minds Education Group about building trust and meaningful relationships with students.

About Our Guests

Emily Meeks  and Taneesha Thomas are Co-Founders of Focused Minds Education Group founded in 2018.  Collectively they have 30 years of experience in education. As retired educators and now school mental health advocates, Emily and Taneesha are committed to supporting the wellbeing of adolescents and adults.

 Focused Minds Education Group facilitates meaningful and impactful professional learning workshops to organizations globally that promote growth, resiliency, and wellness for all.


Tom

Hi, I’m Tom.

 

Patrick

And I’m Patrick.

 

Tom

And we lead SHARE, which stands for stories of humanity and resourcefulness and education.

 

Patrick

On this podcast, we have practical conversations with inspiring educators. Welcome, Emily, welcome Taneesha.

 

Taneesha

Hello.

 

Emily

Hi guys.

 

Tom

Welcome.

 

Taneesha and Emily

Thank you.

 

Patrick

So let’s jump into it. What is the work of Focused Minds Education Group?

 

Emily

Well, Focused Minds Education Group is a solutions-based firm founded in 2018, and we’re headquartered here in Atlanta, Georgia. And we’ve traveled the south east region of the US providing training to educators on mental health awareness with incorporating trauma-informed practices. And we like to focus on how to use literacy as a means to build skills and heal within our communities, and our goal is to promote growth, resiliency and wellness, and adolescents and adults.

 

Patrick

And how did the two… So, that was Emily. How did you Emily and Taneesha get-together to actually found this organization.

 

Taneesha

Emily and I met here in Atlanta at a local high school. We became the content leads for American Literature, and I was returning to the classroom from a position as an instructional coach, and she and I just simply partnered and began to plan and deconstruct those standards for the students. Writing was a focus at the school at the time, and we both were lovers of writing, knew what writing did for us. So we were able to just connect instantly and began to plan and our scores to go up and we develop a system and shared it with other teachers throughout the school. So here we are with Focus Minds.

 

Patrick

So you work with folks in the Atlanta metro area, but also across a couple of different states, is that right?

 

Emily

Yes, that is correct. We started out here in Atlanta, Georgia, however, what we realized is our schools that are here are no different from any other school in the US or around the world, and that is we have kids who have experienced some type of trauma potentially, and/or have a mental health condition, and no training was being provided at the time for us to gain more knowledge about those mental health conditions and how that actually affects learning.

 

Patrick

So we had had a previous conversation and you had spoken about the role of building strong relationships with students, and that’s something you’ve started to do when you met at this high school. Can you talk about why… I mean, I don’t wanna sound cynical, but I can imagine some teachers saying, “No, I’m the teacher, and there’s a… I’m here to provide education, so… That’s it. Why do I need to build a relationship?”

 

Taneesha

So we have to simply believe it’s Maslow before Bloom, human connections matter, and it’s evident now more than ever before that we need one another, and specifically, school is a safe place. So when those students do arrive, they should feel welcome and nurtured and loved, and that was one thing that the two of us would always do, even if we would notice that we were feeling off that day, we had one another to talk to, and it was a safe space, even if it was doing lunch or after school, just to be brief with one another case, and the students saw that, the students saw that when we walked through the hall. They saw us making a connection and just filling… Just love, that’s really what it was. And thank, you…

 

Emily

Now that I think about that.

 

Taneesha

Yes, it was… Just showing them love and respect. I think that the aspect of respect has to be incorporated when you talk about building relationships, because building it and working with a population of students who may have experienced some type of adverse childhood experience. One of the things that is missing potentially is a relationship building for the relationship they have with the parent, and many of our students actually were in group homes. So building that relationship with them was essential because we became a constant figure in their lives. For me to those kids would have been moving around from home to home or location, so that’s super important just to build the trust and allow them the opportunity to know that this is a safe space where they can share and learning can occur.

 

Tom

It’s also the educational system at large. And I think that’s one way to think about the approach is that charity begins at home, as they say, but it’s really an effort that takes awareness in the larger community and an effort in the larger community. How do you… How is the community involved in what you do? How do you go about building community?

 

Emily

That’s a great question.

 

Taneesha

I’m glad that you asked that. We were able to partner with some awesome organizations that are powering this movement, and with that, we were able to meet you guys with Resilient Educator Coalition, through the Attachment and Trauma Network. We are also partnered with Kaiser Permanente. It’s just we have sought out those people, like you said, who have already built the community, and bringing that aspect of how to bring… Use literacy to build skills and healed as educators So I feel that we have a very unique perspective and somewhat of a quasi-study from our experiences in the classroom. Having this confirmation, have learned about ACEs and the impact and then applying it to our instructional design to ensure that we are being just simply respectful of their situations and making sure that they are calm when they’re learning, so.

 

Patrick

Most of the readily available literature on social-emotional learning and trauma-informed care has a kind of scientific bend to it. It’s almost like understanding physiologically what’s happening to the body and distress, or how the mind has difficulty regulating its own emotions in certain situations when the fight-or-flight-or-freeze instinct kicks in. But you’re pairing, which for me and Tom… We’re right at home there, because we’d like to think of ourselves as a literate people, but the pairing of trauma-informed care and literacy or the arts more generally. Can you describe what that looks like?

 

Emily

Okay, well, what we talk about, and we’re go in to talk with the teachers, is to bring in and think about literature that you’re actually using within the classroom. Talk about building skills and healing as educators, we are sometimes, sometimes [we] have to work from the standard-space approach. And so looking at the standards-based approach, what we do is go in and say, okay, here is an anchor text. We’re going to take and strategically find the text that may speak to some different situations or connections with those students we have in our classroom. And that could be anything from their personal interest to their own personal life stories and finding characters or literature that make confident, and what we do is I’m allowing to have the open dialogue and discussion, which essentially, once they realize or potentially see themselves within a character, then we can begin to open that door to the learning process and touch on those standards, but from a position of prior knowledge and something that they’re familiar with, I think what we’ve noticed is with the fixed curriculum that many educators have… Those texts aren’t connecting with the kids, and so what we do is we encourage teachers to get some supplemental texts, learn about those students in the classroom. It’s going to help them not only master these standards, but also to building that relationship as well.

 

Taneesha

Exactly, I agree. How can we demonstrate understanding of trauma, equity, justice, all through literacy instruction? It can be done.

 

Patrick

What’s the role of the students choice in designing that curriculum or selecting those supplemental readings?

 

Emily

I think it’s very big. Being able to give that student voice and that voice and choice comes in with simply being prepared. As an educator, what are those supplemental checks that you have selected, preparing for them perhaps, and annotated bibliography, which is a skill that they will need. And display the books to them in that fashion and have them to vote: Which of these appeals to you? And this is coming up in our curriculum next week, and I wanna know which way do I go with this? What do you guys want to do? And they would have a discussion and say why, and I would go to bed and they commit and enjoyed the time and class.

 

Taneesha

And also just to add to that, not only the reading but the writing, as we talked about earlier is a huge piece. We oftentimes gave kids the opportunity, what we like to call Freestyle Fridays. And Freestyle Friday was an opportunity for the kids to write about really whatever they were feeling in that moment. It gave him that choice, it gave them that voice to who potentially meant to share were allowed to share. But it wasn’t punitive, and one of the roles was to make sure that he’s understood the writing doesn’t always have to be a punitive process. [It can be] a release of their feelings, a release or whatever is going on, and just to have opportunities to write that down in as we call free style, then it gave an opportunity to feel heard and to feel as though what they were feeling was important.

 

Patrick

It sounds like through a lot of the things that both of you have done as educators and as founders of this organization is find a lot of success in building trust with students, which seems from an outsider’s perspective, like a very difficult thing to do. Can you talk about some of the strategies that you used to build?

 

Emily

Well, I was gonna say, I just think I met the one particular student, and this is true in my first year teaching. I didn’t really know what my role was. You’re coming from teachers, school, getting your certificate, you think, Okay, I’m just here to teach, and being the person who I am naturally, a nurture, I would meet my kids at the door every morning, smile at them every morning because I would let them to know this is a welcoming space. And unbeknown to me, midway through the semester, I had a student, through all the writing things we talked about at the time, she just came to me and shared with me that she had been abused and she needed help. And it was because of a conversation that we were having in class, she felt comfortable with sharing that information with me. And at that point, a first year teaching, I realized, this is a gift, everybody doesn’t… All the teachers apparently haven’t heard her story. This is the first time she had her story, and the fact that she felt comfortable and trusted me enough that information to get it to the right person and not feel ashamed, and later on, I still follow this student and later on, it just became without her really knowing it, I made her feel safe. And so, building trust is important so that kids feel safe, many of them came from environments where it may not be a safe environment, and you have to understand it. Like you said, it’s more than just teaching. We’re autnie, we are… What else Taneesha? We’ve been a couple of other things as well in the classroom. Sometimes you’re the mom. You just never know the impact that you might have them that they need… So we’re gonna allow them to voice what they need and what role they wanna supply, but at the same time, still putting learning at the forefront of it all.

 

Taneesha

And to speak to that with a whole school-wide perspective, this can be done with a very, very engaged student government. Each school has this. This is something that has been going on since school was school. So if you have people who know they want to share their voice and it’s being led by someone who wants the culture and traditions to be throughout the school, that is one way that you can do it. Everyone wants that way to be seen specifically in the cafeteria, so we would do enrichment and engaging activities and the cafeteria, but it’s hosted by students They see other students being empowered to make some badges.The idea is that you are able to leave class three minutes earlier and for some three minutes people are hearing this because I’m gonna call socializing, but if other kids want to know what are you doing, show them your badge. Show them that you are able to do something and invite them to come at the table doing lunch. And it worked. We told seniors that… So it really is the ownership of the leadership within that school to figure out where, how can I mass communicate… At lunch in the cafeteria, and SGA is an awesome place to start. So to actually normalize the stigma of mental health and trauma. They have stories.

 

Emily

Right.

 

Patrick

In a previous conversation, you had also talked about the power of using popularity among the school to drive change or to at least get other students involved. Can you tell us about how you do that?

 

Taneesha

So it’s like homecoming, just think of those moments, those milestone moments at school, who those heavy hitters or the most popular kids would be, and we would send them invitations that they would get in class and make a big deal out of… You can invite too, we would like to your voice. This is for you, type thing, and they would be involved in homecoming in. You have a art club, those artists who… Teachers may think are just sitting doodling. They can create a backdrop for your homecoming dance that would blow your socks off if get you to simply ask. If you get them involved and provide the tools and resources for them to stay after school, that became a thing for them, using those football players. Can you wear this pin on your jersey today: This is something that the SGA wants to give you, but it’s also spreading a mission or a task that we were trying to complete to invite other students. And it worked.

 

Taneesha

And I think about it almost, I mean, just with any other major sport or anything else, education is no different. You see them wearing the messages wearing these different symbols to let people know, Hey, I am a part of this movement and so on is to feel like they are leading a movement, and if that movement is, Hey, let’s in this particular stigma on mental health, or Let’s bring awareness to these particular issues, they all wear that proudly because it makes an ambassador, makes them a leader. It’s teaching kids to how to lead. We know that everyone can’t be a leader, but you have those identified leaders already. Give them that voice that they need and opportunities to say, Hey, you too can speak up because I have… So that’s important. Yeah.

 

Patrick

I’m always tempted to think of trauma-informed approaches to education or even just social-emotional ways of building community within schools as, very simply put, the leaders and the teachers in that school paying attention to what’s going on in the lives of the students. And when they design interventions or programs or reach out to the students, they do it after having paid attention… Is that too simple?

 

Emily

It’s not, it’s really not. I know that we are in an age of virtual learning, and that has somewhat been a challenge to make that identification for those students. However, as an educator, you’re always an educator, and I feel as though there are just little moments where if you’re paying attempt to that kid, and sometimes it’s a very quiet kid, and sometimes it’s a very loud kid, but when you know the student is not giving the same energy or the same attention that they may normally show or display, and that’s an opportunity to kinda check in and it’s just as simple as paying attention. And the truth of the matter is, we necessarily can’t save them all, that was something that I had to come to groups with early on, however, our mission is to get more educators to start simply paying attention so that we can save and support more… That’s really the key. And if you lead with that relationship first, if you lead with the trust building first, then they’re more actually open to share with you, you don’t even have to prod, really, because they all want to share. And providing those spaces and times listening, it’s about being intentional, intentionally planning those times where it’s okay to share. That is your moment to pay attention, so build that time in where you can age and identify and hear from your kids, you have to build that time.

 

Taneesha

And when we say to the attention, but is just simply being aware, we’re not saying teachers have to be clinicians and be able to diagnose what they see, but simply be praying. And have the awareness and the ability to say, Hey, something may be going on with Taneesha today. Make a mental note to yourself to check in with her tomorrow, and you have those go-to strategies that you can connect to because you have an officially trained and you do truly become that urgent responder for that one student.

 

Tom

You’re kind of talking about also, awareness is a good word. It’s about a sort of presence in the classroom where you are paying attention to how students are feeling, not just what they’re doing.

 

Emily

I agree Tom.

 

Patrick

So you have also mentioned that the students in the past have called you auntie or mom, which means that you’re playing a huge emotional role in their lives. So what does it look like when you have conversations with these students, parents, knowing the kind of role that you play in their lives?

 

Taneesha

I have a little trick because I’m good with names, so I would always prepare by simply memorizing students names, parent name, and just the three numbers of their phone number. So during the first week of school I would just simply say, Emily, I don’t think that it’s the idea. I do have time to contact Ms Meets if I need to at AT&T at 404, and the kids… So these are ninth graders, and they’re like, How do you know my mom’s name, how do you know where my mom works? We’re friends. You didn’t know that. That’s the secret speaker that we have. And I would just simply tell them that we were friends, and then afterwards I would then have to call mom and say, Hey, if they ask if we’re friends, we’re friends. You can call me any time. But it worked for them, and it work for me, and it created a community in my classroom where parents were texting me after hours of calling at 6 am or informing me of something to do, and on the flip side, I would create a system to communicate with parents maybe using a text messaging system and say, Hey, this is the text that we discussed in class today. If you ask a student this question and they give you an answer and show up at the door tomorrow, bonus points. I would have a line, because they’re trying to help their students become better, but we can’t do that unless we communicate that with them.

 

Emily

I love my parents. A lot of times when I reach out to them, kinda like Taneesha, but I would call parents in the new of class… Right, and the parent never heard from me before, I would call middle of class and I’m talking to the parent and I’m just kind of sharing with them and letting them also feel as though I’m not calling you with the tone of, Get your kid in order. I’m calling them with the spirit of, I’m here to support you. Here’s the behavior or Here’s what I’ve noticed, what can you share with me to help me be you and involve the parent that way. You never wanna call a parent and maybe just always giving that negative information or a negative tone, you want to call them as I am your support system. I am here to help you, but what do I need… And what I found and just calling them in those moments, I get a lot more information and I never thought I was going to get. And those parents still would call me. I had parents still that will text me now and communicate with me now about their kids and how well they’re doing, or to thank me and say thank you helping them and for being a part of their life and helping them on the right track, so those relationships are lasting, that’s why I feel like it’s so super important that to have opportunities to where you can connect with those parents. Create the chance for paying attention, and with your lessons, how can you transfer the information so the kid wants to go home and talk about it. I would create projects, and I used to have this project where I would have the kids to interview their parent or guardian and ask the particular questions, and a lot of times it would come back and tell me… I found out information about my parents that I didn’t even know, you know. And so then it becomes not just at home or at school thing is the community, we’re working together. So the parents appreciate that. And then other months to actually care about their children as a parent, I know the teachers take care about my kids. It was super important.

 

Patrick

I know that there’s a lot of educators out there who would say… Teaching is hard enough already. I go into the classroom, I try and teach kids who don’t want to learn what I have to teach them, how am I gonna reach out to their parents too, and try and engage them in the process and think about curriculum in ways that are more involved? I only really have enough time and energy to do the job that the school is asking me to do, how am I gonna go sort of above and beyond the call to do the sort of things that you’re talking about, what would you say to them?

 

Taneesha

If I can be honest, I say, I can be perfectly one say that that person is not an educator because the role of an educator that’s not… You start with the love first. You have to love what you do, and if you don’t love children, if it doesn’t excite you, to see kids get it, if it doesn’t excite you to see kids thriving, if it doesn’t excite you to see kids succeeding, then teaching is, education, it’s just not your calling or your passion. We never got into the role of being educators because we felt like it was just too much or above and beyond anything. We got in it with the intention of helping kids, and so me coming from a background, my mother taught for 30 years, and me watching her I never heard my mother come home and complain of how, Oh, I don’t wanna go to work ’cause these kids are… This is too much. It was something that I watched happen. And so I would say to an educator who’s feeling that way, to go back and reflect and figure out what their “why” is, why are you an educator? Why are you in this position? What is it that you want to support the kids and if you can’t really come up with the answers to those questions, then it may just be this particular field is not for you, it’s just not. It’s my personal belief.

 

Emily

And for me, I want to say that those feelings may be valid for some, that it is overwhelming, possibly because leadership has not approached it in a linear format that the front-end work matters if we’re going to improve all outcomes. And in our profession the front-end work would be our teachers. So they would have to consider that perspective. And how do you move them? How did you build capacity in someone who thinks this is overwhelming? How do we support them with creating processes and procedures in their classroom that they just simply… It, it’s second nature, that it is an additional additional for you to do, but it is a more systematic inferal of a strategic way of getting your job done while doing those other things.

 

Taneesha

I agree with you.

 

Patrick

So if I’m understanding what both of you are saying correctly, the idea of creating this community around the educational experience, including the teachers, including the students, including the parents, is not an add-on. It is essential.

 

Emily

Yes, it is essential, and as Taneesha was saying, you have to have someone in that leadership role that understands that and is empathetic to that, and it’s ready to be a change agent and look to support their teachers as well. You have to actually have to build that capacity with your staff, if that means that we create a Zen space or a mindful space inside of that school building where a teacher can go to have five or 10 minutes to regroup and reset themselves before or after class. That’s how you do that, have those conversations. Ask the teachers, What is it can I do for you to make your job a little bit easier so that you can focus on the actual work of building those relationships and engaging those kids? It does start at the top. I’ve worked for a few principals, and I can honestly say there’s one principals that I know for fact, it’s out in my mind who focus on really us and how we feel and allow us to voice our concerns in a way that, lokay, I understand you, I hear what you’re saying. Let me see what I can do to support. And that’s just, unfortunately, not across the board, but if we have more leaders who wanted to lead and lead that work, that will help.

 

Patrick

Yeah, I went to a multi-tiered systems of support conference in San Diego last year before covid got really bad, and I was in multiple sessions with the type of principal that you’re talking. At every point, she would just raise her hand and advocate for all of her teachers, those who were really inspired to incorporate social-emotional learning into their work, and even those who were tired, who needed some support. And I wish I had gotten her card because she was actually a principal in the Atlanta metro area was… But of course, I’m sure there are lots of really inspiring administrators across your region.

 

Emily

There are… There are… And I think that the work that we do, we’ve also put some together to have the conversations with leaders as well. And Taneesha, just to say a little bit about the work that she’s done when we taught together, she did the most amazing teacher appreciation. We had a whole week that she planned of events and to this day, people to literally post pictures from that day and from that week, and talk about how it made them feel. We had Hollywood stars on the floor as we walked into the building that she had cut out and created into names or made us really feel like we were the stars of the show, we were an essential part of making sure that that school and that community felt loved. I felt cared about. And I’ve never had an appreciation week to go even partly as great as that. So just doing things like that. Find someone in your building, everybody’s not gonna be on order, if you find somebody in your building who has a time and who has the drive to just pour a little bit into the staff and create something to it or a moment to recognize your educators as a central part of building that morale and building relationships, and a making sure people will show up to work every day because they feel valued. You can’t leave them out. So that’s something that we definitely have discussed is having just sessions for leadership principals, coaches, superintendents to understand that this is an effort that they have to leave.

 

Patrick

Right.So let’s talk a little bit about specifically what Focused Minds Education Group does, the types of services that you offer to schools and districts and other organizations.

 

Emily

So the 4E framework, The for your framework, is a framework that we design, and it’s a framework for planning for planning purposes and has incorporated… ’cause all the listen planning and everything that we’ve done over the years, you have Maslow’s and the hierarchy of needs and Marzano, but the one thing that we felt it was missing was this opportunity to bring in as we’re discussing these moments of supporting them socially and emotionally and really thinking about and being intentional about that. So our workshops, like Taneesha has mentioned, they’re customized, we customize them to talk about instructional support, we can talk about, or we train on trauma-informed practices, we talk about ACEs awareness, we just recently did a workshop with the community, I’m talking about just that alone, just bring awareness about whatever childhood experiences are. I’m having moments in those sessions for teachers and those also reflect, but on the flip side of that, we also offer workshops for students as well, and one of the workshops that we’ve offered is a writing workshop, and that writing workshop is just talking about expressive writing, writing, journaling, the different therapeutic aspects of being able to write down how you feel and what that can do for them going forward and impact their lives differently.

 

Taneesha

Another program that we offer is some people, parents. We know now that parents are faced with the challenges of covid, I never be full work, our society hasn’t seen a collective trauma like this since 9/11, so we offer dealing with anxiety and academics, how to listen to your child without judgment, how to remain calm, what rounding can you do to model for your children. Another hot topic that we don’t really like to discuss, but it is there, is suicide and suicide prevention, and letting parents know skills and what to do from using mental health first-aid training to support a student or their job that made the experiencing crisis and just how to really listen to that and take it in and what next steps they can do to support them, so not only do we focus on schools and organizations, but also community and parent…

 

Emily

That’s what I was thinking of. Mental health first-aid training is an important training that we feel all parents, all adults really should have, because while we’re not clinicians and why we do not attest to be, it allows them to see any the sign they may need to be aware of, and this as we were talking about early in the conversation about building relationships, that particular training, even if you have not built a relationship with the kid, it shows you and instructs you how to approach that conversation or a situation, if you think that something could be a little off. Rather than just going to make those assumptions, you wanna make sure your approach that kid and have the tools to speak to them about that candidly, but then also there to send that information and who to go to depending on what the child share. So that’s really, really super important to make sure that all educators have that training on mental health first-aid, so that they can have those skills. They need them.

 

Patrick

So how do people get in touch with you if they’re interested in the curriculum that you have or any of the other training that you offer?

 

Emily

We are on all social media platforms at focusedminds.edu. You can schedule a chat with us. We do free 15-minute checks, one for educators, or they can call us and just talk about instructional if they’re having some difficulties and also schedule some one-on-one time if they need to for support, and then we have what we call future-focused leaders, and that particular chair is to for leadership to call us and we just talk them through what are the next steps, going through a needs assessment to see what type of training, they do need. Currently, what noticing the trend is the writing… A lot of schools want the writing piece, and then for the educators, they’re looking for more of the awareness, because now mental health is a topic -burgeoning.

 

Taneesha

Yeah, it’s there, and we know that teachers deserve the highest quality of professional learning. They are the first responders, so with our combined 30-years of experience, we have decided to support and find a solution to say, Hey, guys… Like you say a Patrick, let’s just start paying attention to this plus this and see if we can improve learning outcomes for all.

 

Emily

So they can get in contact with us. Our website is www.focusedmindsedugroup.com. All the information is there. Currently, we are also offering some virtual learning support for parents, and they can call us to discuss that as well. To see, again, what their child needs, and there’s a form to fill out, an assessment form, if you will, to share with us, and we contact them about any support they need in math or ELA.We’re here.

 

Tom

That’s really wonderful. What a great resource.

 

Taneesha

Yeah, thank you, Tom.

 

Emily

We’re trying to trying to support… Thank you guys for a good experience.

 

Patrick

Oh yeah, I’ve got one last question for you, which is, we are hopefully in the waning days of the coronavirus outbreak. It may extend many more months still, but there’s at least some glimmer of hope, so what is the first thing you two will do when we finally get the all clear.

 

Taneesha

Vacation. Honestly, I’m really ready to get back to traveling to share and spread our mission. While we understand that virtual is essential to preventing the spread of the coronavirus, we definitely want everyone to be safe, but we want to easily gradually get back into the hands-on face-to-face approach, because human connection is essential for everybody. I think that a lot of educators are missing that human connection factor as well, and just being able to get back out there and share our mission and support them is really what I’m excited to get to get back to doing, to be honest, meaning to…

 

Emily

And if they can’t just travel right away, there is a wonderful event center that we were presenting at just this weekend as someone mentioned. I wouldn’t mind just simply having a community awareness of it, so people can come, of course, with covid restrictions in play, but something small. Just to start the conversation in the community, right.

 

Taneesha

So we’re looking at small intimate settings, small groups to continue this work, and anyone who potentially would like for us to come to their city, we are open to that as well, and be sure just to follow us to see all of the great things we’re doing different things we’re offering different courses and workshops in different partnerships that… You never know. We’ve noticed, you never know what may happen. So we’re excited and we’ll continue no matter what, ’cause this is the work that we have set out to do, and we wanna make sure that we are delivering this message for our community, the faces of our community, to let teachers know that, Hey, it’s okay. It’s okay that you’re dealing with something and it’s overwhelming, we understand, we hear you, we see you, and just how can we help you to navigate through what you’re feeling, so we’re ready.

 

Emily

We’re ready to share! Yeah, we’re ready to share.

 

Patrick

Emily, Taneeshsa, thank you so much for joining us today. I really enjoyed a conversation.

 

Tom

Me, too.

 

Patrick

And best of luck with Focused Minds Education Group and everything you’re doing in 2021.

Emily and Taneesha

Thank you so much, guys. We appreciate you guys as well. Thank you so much.